Self Help Part 1 – What Are The Signs That I Could Have ADHD

What Are The Signs That I or Someone I Know Could Have ADHD?

The main symptoms of Adult ADHD are:
• Impulsiveness
• Forgetfulness
• Leaving things unfinished or to the last minute
• Extreme emotions and/or feelings of rejection
• Becoming easily distracted
• Disorganised
• Poor Time Management
• Suffering with anxiety and/or depression
• Low frustration tolerance
• Trouble multitasking
• Excessive activity or restlessness

To be diagnosed with ADHD, according to the American DSM-5 criteria there should be:

Five or more symptoms of inattention and/or ≥5 symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity must have persisted for ≥6 months to a degree that is inconsistent with the developmental level and negatively impacts social and academic/occupational activities.

Several symptoms (inattentive or hyperactive/impulsive) were present before the age of 12 years.
Several symptoms (inattentive or hyperactive/impulsive) must be present in ≥2 settings (eg, at home, school, or work; with friends or relatives; in other activities).

Clear evidence that the symptoms interfere with or reduce the quality of social, academic, or occupational functioning.

To be diagnosed with ADHD, according to the UK NICE criteria there should be:

Five or more symptoms of inattention and/or ≥5 symptoms of hyperactivity/impulsivity must have persisted for ≥6 months to a degree that is inconsistent with the developmental level and negatively impacts social and academic/occupational activities.

Several symptoms (inattentive or hyperactive/impulsive) were present before the age of 12 years.
Several symptoms (inattentive or hyperactive/impulsive) must be present in ≥2 settings (eg, at home, school, or work; with friends or relatives; in other activities).

Clear evidence that the symptoms interfere with or reduce the quality of social, academic, or occupational functioning.

In Self Help Part 2 – we’ll look at examples for each of the main symptoms of Adult ADHD listed above

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